August 15, 2022
Ronald Mugembe

The family of a Garissa University terror attack survivor in Kisii County is living in regret after their son failed to get a teaching a job due to the disability he acquired after the Al-Shabaab attack in 2015

In an interview that was aired on March 2, 2020, Ronald Mugembe, a Kisii resident, narrated how tough life has been since the terror attack rendered him disabled.

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Ronald Mugembe during a press interview on February 22, 2020.

YouTube

Ronald had forgotten his laptop in a classroom and so he went back to look for it, and that is where the trouble began. He was shot twice with one bullet cutting through the lower right ear into the lower jaw something that has affected his hearing.

Another bullet didn’t spare his arm, it split his fingers causing Ronald to require amputation on the injured fingers

“I had forgotten my laptop and I went back to collect it. Before I could leave, I pepped through the window to check what was happening outside and that is when I was shot at, ” explained Ronald.

The graduate teacher explained that it has been hard to get a job ever since with many schools turning him back due to his disability. 

“Instead of helping me, they have been victimizing me. They keep asking how I am going to participate in extracurricular activities and teach yet I cannot hear,” he revealed.

His mother Josephine Nyanchera stated that his son was okay before the attack, asserting that treating him in such a way was not right. Ronald urged the President to intervene and help him get a job. In unison, the family called on both the National and County government to step in.  

“We have struggled a lot to take him to school with our hopes tied to his success but now he can’t even help himself let alone us,” stated the Father, Cosmas Moranga

On 3 April 2015, four gunmen stormed Kenya’s Garissa University College and began firing bullets indiscriminately in an attack that was deadliest in Kenyan history. The attackers singled out and shot those identified as Christians as they moved from building to building. By the end, 148 people had been killed – mostly students.

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